How to enable the 3D Manipulator Gizmo in Blender

The other day I’ve been happily using the 3D Manipulator Gizmo in Blender and the world was at peace. The next day, I guess a new version must have come along or some other bit in the matrix was dropped, causing my Blender scene to no longer show that manipulator. Where had it gone? Was I imagining things again?

A quick internet search suggested to enable this option at the top of the screen. However mine was already enabled, and my gizmo buddy still wasn’t showing up. What was going on?

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How to track your GoPro Order

GoPro is one of those companies that’s a bit like Apple: “special” and “difficult” perhaps describes them best. You expect one thing, and they do it a different way. How they deal with their website orders is a good example.

You’d expect that you can login on GoPro.com and under “your account” find a list of orders you’ve placed over the last year or so. Surprisingly that’s not the case, and to the innocent bystander it appears that no matter how much money you’ve given that company, it’s your first visit to their store. Kind of scary when I placed a $400 order recently, without the ability to check what the status of it was.

Thankfully there is a slightly funky tool that lets you hack in your email and ZIP code to get at least some kind of information out of GoPro – and here’s that link, the one that should be on the front page of GoPro somewhere:

Change your locale at the top right accordingly (the above gets you to the US store, I’m assuming this works with other locations). The interface looks a bit like this:

After hacking in my details, I got a page that looks like this:

Admittedly it’s not much, but at least it’s something to prove that GoPro have heard of me, and are doing… something. I guess orders placed longer 60 days ago aren’t retrievable. Who wants to think of past gadgets anyway? It’s the future we’re all living for isn’t it? The moment, the “here and now”, while waiting for that “pending order” to finally arrive.

Don’t ask me what “pending” means, or how long it takes for GoPro to send out an item. I’ve only tried it once before with an accessory, and it was dispatched within 2 days. I received an email with a tracking number and all went swimmingly well. With a more expensive item, like this HERO 8 trade-in deal I made with the devil? No idea. From what I remember, my camera is supposed to be dispatched “within two weeks”, that’s all I know. We’re nearing the end of week two, that’s all I’m saying.

I’ll update this article when this order status changes. Until such time, let’s hang tight and all “be stoked” about it.

How to use an external image editor with Blender

I was trying to (badly) edit an image texture in a scene I had open in Blender. I thought to myself, wouldn’t it be nice to have an option to click on that texture in Blender, then launch the image editor of my choice for a quick edit? I had no idea where to find this, so after some research I found out – and here’s how it works:

Head over to Edit – Preferences.

Under File Paths, there’s an option to select any application to be your go-to image editor. I’m using Photoshop, but any application will work.

So far so good. Now we’ll need to navigate to the image we’d like to edit. That’s a big issue right there, because it’s not as simple as it sounds in Blender (at least for me it isn’t).

I’ll use the UV Editing workspace as an example, in which I spend about 15 minutes trying to find the texture I’d like to edit. When it finally shows up in the large image editor on the left, we can call up the external editor with Image – Edit Externally. Look at the second row from the top to find the Image option.

The slightly convoluted menu structure at the top makes sense only to Blender users of course. It’s also a subtle hint as to why Blender is perhaps not the industry standard it could be. Menus like that scare people off, even though Blender does not intend to scare you. It just… exposes a lot of options.

Depending on how your image is stored (externally or as part of the .blend file), you may get a message along the lines of “image is packed”. If that happens, you need to choose Unpack, then try again.

Reloading Images in Blender

Once your masterful edit is complete, it’s time to save any changes you’ve made. Without saving in your image editor, changes won’t appear in Blender. So hit save, and return back to Blender.

Sometimes your updates appear immediately, other times nothing seems to happen. I haven’t worked out what triggers auto updates and what prevents them. In any case, we can manually trigger an image reload by choosing Image – Reload. Alternatively, hover over the image and press ALT + R.

And there we have it! That’s how we can edit texture files in an external editor from Blender. Don’t be discouraged by the menus!

How to scale image textures in Blender

When I import regular OBJ files into Blender, they come in with a basic diffuse shader applied, with the texture file in the right place. Sadly, that texture is often scaled incorrectly. While it is possible to edit the UVs to make it all look handsome, there is an easier way for us to scale textures, namely by adding a Mapping Node into the shader. Here’s how it worked for me.

In the Node Editor, add a Mapping Node (SHIFT+A, then find it under Vector). Leave it on the Point Tab and connect its output to the Vector Input of the Image Texture (the purple one).

Notice that the effect is probably not what you’re looking for. You’ll also need to add a Texture Coordinate Node in front of that, connecting the UV output to the Vector Input of the Mapping Node. I guess otherwise, the Mapping Node doesn’t know what to scale – which makes sense. Once connected, you should see no difference – but no texture weirdness either (other than the wrong scale).

To make a texture smaller, increase all the Scale Values in the Mapping Node. To decrease the texture size, increase the Scale Values on the Mapping Node.

If this inverse law of doing things is freaking you out, switch the Mapping Node over from Point to Texture. Doing so will allow you to decrease the scale values and see a decrease in texture size (and vice versa), but you’ll be dealing with decimal point values. Whatever works for you.

That’s how to do it! Works great in Blender 2.8 and above. Happy fiddling!

How to render a movie file as texture in Blender

I’ve been playing with a new title sequence for shiny new gaming channel, and I thought it would be fun to have a movie file playing on a plane object that’s seen as a screen in a cinema. I knew this was possible in Blender, but I didn’t quite know how to achieve it. After some tinkering I found out. Let me share my findings with you.

It’s very simple actually: setup a material, including a Texture Node, but instead of an image file, we pick a movie file (or image sequence). That’s really all there’s to it. The difficult part is understanding the settings in the Texture File though.

In the fourth drop-down, Movie was selected automatically when I added my movie file. This can be changed to Image or Image Sequence though, just in case yours is not set correctly. For the record, I’m using an MP4 file with H264 encoding, at 60 frames per second. The three following options are interesting (and important).

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How to use the Blender Cloud Add-On

I’ve been a member of the Blender Cloud since 2016, and one of the benefits you get is that your local copy of Blender can interact with… well the Blender Cloud. You can access texture files, HDRIs, save your files, upload your renders and work in progress – all without leaving Blender. That’s cool!

What I can never remember though is how to actually start this thing. I thought I’d write it down here, in the hope that I’ll remember to search this site and find this post. Here’s what we do:

Press CTRL + ALT + SHIFT + A

That’s it! Almost. Before doing that, we must save our .blend file, otherwise anything we pull from the cloud cannot be saved inside our file (a .blend file isn’t just a file, it’s a whole folder hierarchy by the way, which is why we don’t need to specify complicated paths again – very clever).

I assume you’ve got the add-on installed too, which goes without saying. The Blender Cloud folks have a video about that though, check it out:

Distributing Props for DAZ Studio

Making props for DAZ Studio can be fun and easy. Typically you’ve modelled something in your favourite 3D app, UV unwrapped it appropriately, then you import the object into DAZ Studio and setup your surface properties. You can save your work as part of the whole scene, or you can save your selected item on its own.

Bringing our prop back into other scenes on your own computer will probably work just fine, but if you intend to share your work with others, things get a little more complicated. Let’s take a look how we can do it in this article.

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DAZ Studio 116: How to use Mesh Lights

In this episode I’ll explain the basics of using Mesh Lights. Those are surface properties that can make any object emit light. I’ll show you how to set this up, how to adjust it and how to make it invisible so you can shoot through it.

I’ll also throw in some random anecdotes about surface normals and “Shaders vs Material Presets”. I hope you like it! Here’s the link about Surface Normals: – –

And this is the link to Eastman Kodak Museum:

Patreon Supporters can get my Light Starter Scene I’ve mentioned here:

Enjoy!

How to reach Black Rock Processing in CONTROL

I’ve been blundering my way through the CONTROL game, until I came up against one of those seemingly impossible to crack puzzles: I need to get to Black Rock Processing in the Maintenance Sector to move the story forward. That’s not an easy feat. I’ll tell you where I got stuck, and how I eventually got it, and how I worked it out.

We start our journey at the Sector Elevator and head down to the Maintenance Sector. From here we move forward into a room with four exits, one of which reads Black Rock Processing, on the left. These were all blocked by The Hiss earlier, but thankfully we rectified this.

A few minor goons are waiting for us, we deal with them and pass through the Security Check gates and on to a heavy looking tripe door mechanism that opens automatically as we approach. We’ve seen a smilier mechanism on our way to the Ashtray Maze, however this time the bridge that should probably get us to the other side is missing. All we see is a gap too wide to cross.

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My first 24 Hours with the Unreal Engine

In my quest to take a look behind the scenes of how game engines work, I’ve decided to take a closer look at the Unreal Engine, more specifically UE 4.22.3. I had installed it a few weeks ago but other than launch a template or two, I didn’t do anything else with it. After my recent deep dive into Unity, I thought this would make for a nice comparison writeup.

Here’s how I experienced the first 24 hours with Unreal. I’ve even added a video at the end to show you a level that I’ve built. For this review I’ve been following this tutorial series by Paul Kind. He’s a wonderful teacher!

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