Tag Archives: Premiere Pro

How to export 4k video with Premiere Pro CS 5.5

I’ve finally worked out how to export 4k and 2.7k footage with my 6 year old version of Premiere Pro. That’s exciting news and gives the software a new lease on life!

With the standard export presets, tweaked to a resolution higher than 1920×1080, I’ve always encountered the following error message:

Invalid framesize/framerate for this Level. Please lower the Frame Dimensions, Frame Rate or increase the Profile and Level and try again.

Turns out Premiere has actually given me the answer to my problem right there in that error message, I just never really read beyond “lower the frame dimensions”.

Let me show you how to overcome this 1080p limitation in Premiere Pro CS 5.5 and export hi-res video without a hitch.

Continue reading How to export 4k video with Premiere Pro CS 5.5





How to render an image sequence as video in Photoshop

Up until now I had always used Premiere Pro to assemble image sequences of a rendered animation.

I’m still using Premiere Pro CS 5.5 and I’m not currently subscribing to the whole Creative Cloud package. As such, my version of Premiere is stuck somewhere in the past, when 4K was barely an idea, and 1080p was the highest result you would ever need.

The trouble is, I was working on an animation whose resolution was larger than 1920×1080. While Premiere Pro CS 5.5 can handle this and higher resolutions for editing, there doesn’t seem a way to export it at anything above 1920×1080.

My editing needs were moderate at best: assemble 250 frames, repeat those several times, and add a fade to black either end. Which application would be capable of doing this swiftly and efficiently, I wondered?

Photoshop CC can do it! Would you believe it? Here’s how.

Continue reading How to render an image sequence as video in Photoshop





How to export a single frame from your timeline in Adobe Premiere Pro

Export-Frame

There’s an extremely handy shortcut that allows us to export single frames from the playhead’s current position in Premiere’s timeline. It’s not available via a menu command, it’s not particularly advertised, and it saves having to go via the File – Media – Export option, potentially downsizing the original footage.

Take a look at your Program Monitor and find the super tiny camera icon at the bottom right (just next to the Lift and Extract icons we’ve never seen or used before). Click it, and a still image in the format of your choice is created, in the full resolution of the source footage!

Position the playhead anywhere you like and create as many stills as you want. Using the File – Export – Media option will also work, but it will resize your image – and if your source footage is much larger than your target media then that’s not a good choice.

This isn’t meant to be for image sequences of course (for which the Media Encoder is a better option), but it works a treat for quick images you want to pull off your project.





How to copy and paste Motion Effects from one clip to another in Premiere Pro

You can copy and paste whole clips in the timeline with Premiere Pro, but you can also copy and paste applied Motion Effects. Anything you’ve done on one clip can be transferred to another, such as scale, position, any video and audio effect.

Here’s how to do it:

Select the clip in your timeline that has the effects applied, then right-click it and choose copy. This technically copies everything (including the clip), but the secret is in the pasting.

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Next select the clip you’d like to apply these effects to, right-click it and select Paste Attributes.

More recent versions of Premiere Pro allow you to select which attributes to copy, which is a nice touch. I’m still on version 5.5 and don’t have that feature, so all attributes will be applied to the clip. You can always selectively delete attributes you didn’t want to copy, or if this gets annoying, apply only what you need to a “dummy clip” and copy/paste that.





How to clear temporary files in Adobe Premiere Pro

Premiere writes a lot of temp files to various locations – the most obvious of those are saved at the same location as the current project, in a folder simply called Adobe Premiere Pro Preview Files. If you delete an old project, make sure to delete this folder too.

But Premiere does create temporary files in another location too, it’s called the Media Cache Database. I’ve found as much as 50GB in it at one point.

I’m not entirely sure what Premiere is putting there, but it is nice enough to tell us where that cache database is located: head over to Preferences – Media to find out.

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There’s the location, and a convenient CLEAN button we should press regularly, especially because by default this location happens to be on the system drive. To avoid running out of space, feel free to use another drive for the cache database (via the browse option).

Thanks to Jan Ozer for this tip!





How to avoid empty audio tracks in Premiere Pro

Why

Have you ever wondered why a source clip’s audio ends up at the very bottom of the timeline, even though you have several empty tracks above it? Well I have, and I was convinced there had to be some kind of setting responsible for this.

And there is: it has to do with the way a Sequence is setup when you first create it. Let me explain how this works and how to change such behaviour to avoid annoyances in the future.

Continue reading How to avoid empty audio tracks in Premiere Pro





How to reset User Preferences in Premiere Pro

Premiere-LogoThe other day my copy of Adobe Premiere Pro started exhibiting strange behaviour: new projects opened with four timelines (three of which were always empty), audio never made it to the target track (only ever to track 6) – so I thought, perhaps I’ll reset my preferences.

But how do we do that in Premiere? I was frantically looking for an option in the app but sadly to no avail. A quick search on the internet brought the solution to my troubled (4 year old) Premiere installation which has never let me down before.

It’s really easy actually:

Start Premiere Pro with ALT+SHIFT held down (on Windows), or OPT+SHIFT held down (on Mac). 

Worked a treat, and Premiere is its old self again. Just in case this doesn’t work, the preferences are saved i the following locations:

  • on Windows: <drive>\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Premiere Pro
  • on Mac OS X: <drive>/Users/<username>Library/Preferences/com.adobe.AdobePremierePro.plist

Taken straight from Adobe’s Help Pages:





How to apply a transition between multiple clips in Premiere Pro

Premiere Pro has the concept of a Default Transition. This can be applied to multiple selected clips or even all clips in the current timeline. It’s a very handy tool indeed, and I’ve only just found out about it!

To apply it, select the clips in question (either drag around them, or SHIFT-select them in the Timeline), then choose Sequence – Apply Default Transition.

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By default, the Default Transition is a Video Cross Dissolve and an Audio Constant Power transition. You can tell by which transition has a little red marker around it.

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To change it, simply right-click another transition and select Set Selected as Default Transition.

You can set the duration of this transition under Preferences – General.

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How to animate motion with Bezier Tweeners in Premiere Pro

Premiere-Tweener

Tired of linear animations in Premiere Pro? We’re in luck, because Premiere does support full control over ease-in and ease-out controls when you animate with keyframes. It’s just extremely clunky to use.

The process of rendering such frames in between is sometimes referred to as “tweening”. Let’s find out how to use it.

Continue reading How to animate motion with Bezier Tweeners in Premiere Pro





How to import an image sequence in Adobe Premiere Pro

Premiere IconAdobe Premiere Pro can import a series of single images and turn them into an animation.

All we have to do is import all images into our project, then multi-select them and drag them into a sequence.

If you’ve tried this before you may have noticed that a still image in your sequence may not equal the duration of one frame in your timeline, but something like 2 seconds. Highly undesirable for animations.

There is a way to ask Premiere to apply a default duration for still images:

  • on Mac this can be set under Premiere Pro – Preferences – General
  • on Windows it’s under Edit – Preferences – General

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Find the option Still Image Default Duration and set it to one frame. In principle, that’s it. No restart is required and the setting is effective immediately.

Screen Shot 2015-04-04 at 09.16.20You should know however that this applies to images imported going forward and will not change the duration of images that are already in your project. You see, Premiere applies this new default duration when images are brought into the project. If your setting was 50 frames, then all existing images in your project will be unchanged.

While you can change the duration of a single image, I haven’t found a way to do this for multiple existing images in a project.

Therefore, the easiest thing to amend existing images is to remove them from your project and simply import them again. As soon as you drag them into a timeline, each frame will be one frame long and play as an animation.

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